Latest statements from McLean County GOP:

On the Issues: "By their fruits you shall know them."

The saying “By their fruits you will know them” is a well-recognized Biblical saying originating from the gospel according to Matthew, By their fruits you will know them. Do people pick grapes from thornbushes, or figs from thistles? Just so, every good tree bears good fruit, and a rotten tree bears bad fruit. A good tree cannot bear bad fruit, nor can a rotten tree bear good fruit. Every tree that does not bear good fruit will be cut down and thrown into the fire. So by their fruits you will know them” (Matthew 7:16-20, NABRE). - (Click on the title above to continue reading if necessary.)

  • On the Issues: "By their fruits you shall know them."

    The saying “By their fruits you will know them” is a well-recognized Biblical saying originating from the gospel according to Matthew, By their fruits you will know them. Do people pick grapes from thornbushes, or figs from thistles? Just so, every good tree bears good fruit, and a rotten tree bears bad fruit. A good tree cannot bear bad fruit, nor can a rotten tree bear good fruit. Every tree that does not bear good fruit will be cut down and thrown into the fire. So by their fruits you will know them” (Matthew 7:16-20, NABRE). - (Click on the title above to continue reading if necessary.)

  • On the Issues: "We Have No King but Caesar!"

    On Good Friday, March 29, 2024, I attended an afternoon church service commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus. As the congregation listened to the gospel reading’s conversation between Pilate and the crowd, I heard an exchange in which the claim “We have no king but Caesar!” was uttered. This well-known phrase immediately struck my Christian sensitivities, and I thought, “That phrase sounds like something progressives would say.” This reaction was so automatic, and I was so taken aback by the aptness of the characterization that my mind momentarily drifted from the reading of the passion to the general flow of this op-ed. (To continue reading, click the above title if necessary.)

  • On the Issues: Putting Lipstick on a Pig

    The phrase “putting lipstick on a pig” describes making superficial or cosmetic changes to something or someone in a futile attempt to disguise fundamental flaws or failings. The phrase has been used for quite some time, most notably in recent years by President Barack Obama. Its origin seems to be based on the adage, “You can put perfume on a pig, and it might smell sweeter, but at the end of the day, it’s still a pig.” (Click on the above title to continue reading if necessary.)

  • On the Issues: I Am Not a Camera

    Nearly every week since mid-October 2023, I have taken pleasure in writing an essay for McLean County Republicans on a topic of current political or personal interest. It should now be clear to my readers that I enjoy writing. It was not always this way. I once hated to write. It wasn’t until I began to delve deeply into the subject matter that I learned how easy writing is. (To continue reading, click the title above if necessary.)

  • On the Issues: Are Conservative Republicans Bigots? (Part 2)

    In my last On the Issues op-ed (Are Conservative Republicans Bigots? Part 1), I noted how conservative Republicans must be liars, lunatics, or liberal-minded for not supporting anti-bigotry measures of the progressive Left. I made the case that conservative Republicans are not liars because they admit to something that, on the face of it, would do their case nothing but harm and that they would not admit to something they know to be a lie. I then began to build the case that conservative Republicans are not lunatics. I showed that conservative Republicans are well within reason to oppose movements that are purported by progressives to have an anti-bigotry orientation. I showed the illogic of supporting illegal immigration, the Black Lives Matter movement, the 1619 Project, and reparations for slavery. (Click on the above title to continue reading if necessary.)

  • On the Issues: Are Conservative Republicans Bigots? (Part 1)

    As a rather outspoken Communication Manager for McLean County Republicans, I’m used to getting “hate mail” from progressive Democrats. One of the most common accusations I hear is that conservative Republicans are racists or haters – bigots – because they oppose illegal immigration. Also cited as evidence is the undeniable fact that many conservative Republicans oppose the Black Lives Matter movement, the DEI agenda, public education’s 1619 Project, reparations for slavery, affirmative action, and the LGBTQIA+ movement. It would seem, at least on the face of it, that progressives have a solid case for their claim that conservative Republicans are either racist or haters, and perhaps both. But do they? (Click on the title above to continue reading if necessary.)

  • MCGOP Elects Officers, Amends Bylaws

    MCGOP Chairman Dennis Grundler

    (Bloomington, Illinois) The McLean County Republican Central Committee convened in its biennial County Convention on Wednesday, April 17, to elect officers and Executive Board members and amend the organization’s bylaws, marking a significant moment in local governance. The Committee – consisting of all elected Republican precinct committeepersons in McLean County – undertook a series of decisions aimed at fortifying the group’s structure and advancing its mission to serve the community. (Click on the title above to continue reading if necessary.)

  • On the Issues: Stealing Another Day of Life

    Family, friends, and colleagues often ask me, “Why do you work so long and so hard?” My wife asks me this question when she sees me typing away at my computer at 4:30 a.m. or late into the night. My kids wonder why I don’t kick back and practice my hobbies more or take another trip. Besides, I’m over 70 years old, have a great retirement plan, and can afford to do so. (Click on the title above to continue reading if necessary.)

  • On the Issues: Buses & Trains & Government Bloat

    I recently drove north on US51 through downtown Bloomington. It was a sunny Tuesday afternoon. I was nearly pushed out of my lane by a giant Connect Transit bus that we all see lumbering around the Twin Cities. It took up so much of the path before me in preparation for a right turn that I had to hit my brakes to give it clearance. It wasn’t the driving that bothered me so much as the size of the bus and what it represented – government bloat. (Click on the title above to continue reading if necessary.)

  • On the Issues: Righting the Ship of State

    As I began to write this op-ed, I was in the mid-Atlantic aboard a 330-meter-long cruise ship, returning to the United States after visiting Greece, Spain, and Portugal. After departure from the Azores Islands, our ship headed southwest to skirt a gathering storm. Still, we experienced gale-force winds, and 15-foot ocean swells that resulted in the ship listing and rolling – in what one might call a rather tempestuous experience. (Click the title above to continue reading if necessary.)